About Strathbungo

Strathbungo is one of Scotland’s pre-eminent conservation areas with magnificent architecture and a classical Victorian street plan bordering Queen’s Park to the south east and the railway line to the north west. Back lanes are wedged in between the ‘squares’ which play host to beautiful blond and red sandstone fronted terraces of regional, national and international importance.

But to residents, Strathbungo is not simply a few streets containing houses of historical and architectural interest to passing architectural students and affectionardos. It is a healthy, vibrant, safe and stunningly beautiful place to live and for some, to work.

Strathbungo plays host to our families, our friends and our community. It is where we live, where we eat, where we shop and where we socialize. It is where we take our dogs for walks, where we garden and where we relax.

Strathbungo is home to students and university professors; to medics and firefighters; to entrepreneurs and to civil servants; artists and craftsmen. It is home to Scottish, English, Welsh, Irish, American, Italian, Lao, Thai and Indonesian and others. It is home to Christians, Muslims, Jews, Hindus, Buddhists and Bahai’s.

It is a microcosm of much of what we find interesting and delightful in the world.

Strathbungo belongs collectively to the residents. The Strathbungo Society promotes a community spirit and a community cohesiveness that will distinguish Strathbungo from other areas in Glasgow and Scotland, not just in its architectural significance but also in its strong community spirit. The Bungo Blog is the official website of the Strathbungo Society.

We don’t expect you to agree with anything that we put on this blog. Indeed we would be very disappointed if you did for that would mean that the blog is so bland it doesn’t upset anyone. But we do hope that with the re-launch of the website you can start to engage more with each other through the blog. The web team doesn’t see its job to populate the blog with articles to amuse and entertain you. We see our job to stimulate healthy community engagement, share information and promote Strathbungo as a vibrant, healthy, safe and interesting place to be.

  1. Caroline Scott
    June 18th, 2007 at 09:51 | #1

    Looking at the map of Strathbungo and notice that it excludes Niddrie Road.
    The historic centre of Strathbungo was at the intersection of Alison St. and Pollokshaws Road. and my early 20th century map has the text ‘Strathbungo’ covering pretty much my house across from Arnold Clarks. I hope to reclaim my place in the village of Strathjbungo and hope you would alter the map accordingly.

  2. Paul
    October 17th, 2007 at 08:50 | #2

    Quite right Caroline. Some years ago the council put up new street signs that said ‘Strathbungo’ on them around the historic Strathbungo village.
    The Strathbungo Society kicked up about the ones around Niddrie Road and Niddrie Square – anywhere east of Pollokshaws Road basically.
    As a result, we had the daft situation where the ‘Strathbungo’ bit of the signs were covered up. You can still see them today.
    Strathbungo isn’t just the conservation area!
    I’d say the west side of Craigie Street should be considered the Strathbungo border. What does it say on the side of St Bride’s Primary – ‘Strathbungo’!

  3. Emma
    June 4th, 2008 at 21:08 | #3

    Does anyone have any information or photographs of the police station that was once on March Street. I’ve heard a few people mention it and you can see where the cells were at the back of the building. Any information would be great.

  4. Sheryl
    July 18th, 2008 at 09:56 | #4

    I must stay I did wonder about the boundary and about the awful mess that the council had made of the Balvicar Street sign on my house. It is interesting, in fact a bit surprising to me, to learn the the Strathbungo society was responsible for that.

    While I appreciate the ‘conservation’ area excludes my house it appears to me that it is a rather elete society that you operate. I live in a B listed building (only a fraction of Strathbungo is B listed) and just because my house is in G42 rather than G41 I am excluded from the Strathbungo society despite the fact that my house overlooks much of Strathbungo and was built in the same era and indeed in Strathbungo by the looks of things.

    I used to live in Strathbungo and the architecture of my new B listed flat if far superior to that of my Strathbungo B listed one. Would it be possible to ammend the information of your site so that is clear that you map refers to the ‘Modern Strathbungo Conservation Area’ rather than the ‘Strathbungo Historic Area’ which is what I was mislead to believe was covered by your society.

    For historical accuracty you might even like to consider in the future increasing the boundary of your map and indeed the society to include the parts of the historic Strathbungo that are currently excluded.

  5. Matt
    July 18th, 2008 at 12:54 | #5

    As I remember it, some of the signs that were covered said Crosshill and not Strathbungo, so it can’t have been down to the Strathbungo Society. How would they object anyway and under what piece of legislation/byelaw? Seems unlikely to me that the council would spend money covering signs when asked by a non-statutory body such as the Strathbungo Society.

    Sheryl, you say only a fraction of Strathbungo is listed. Of course this depends on the definition of Stathbungo we’re all debating here.Also, anything less than 100 per cent is a fraction so even if 95 per cent were listed, only a fraction would be listed. What do you mean by a fraction? I’d estimate that over 50 per cent of the houses in the area marked as Strathbungo on this web site’s map are A or B listed. All the streets in the conservation area are A or B listed, except Marywood Square. The map does say “Conservation border” to make clear where the conservation area is.

    Can any of you give a definitive border to Strathbungo? I’ve not seen one in any of your comments. It’s no use complaining without giving a solution. List the streets, please.

  6. Bungo Blog
    July 18th, 2008 at 15:07 | #6

    By way of some background to the present form of the Strathbungo Society and the boundary of its remit, it is important to remember that in 1994 the previous ‘Strathbungo Conservation Society’ was reconstituted as the current Strathbungo Society. The Conservation Society for 20 years had concerned itself with planning issues and limited its membership to the listed terraces (Moray Place, plus the ‘squares’ of Regent Park, Queen and Marywood). Although conservation remains important, the new Strathbungo Society did extend its membership to all of the terraced streets leading off Queens Park, including the red sandstone ‘Garden’ streets built in the early 20th century and the Victorian tenements that form the logical boundaries. Any consideration of extending its boundaries further would have to be properly considered at the forthcoming AGM.

    The AGM is on the 19th August at 7.30pm at Queens Park Parish Church on Queens Drive. Everyone is very welcome to attend and start a discussion on this subject.

  7. Caroline Scott
    March 11th, 2009 at 17:11 | #7

    Matt, check out the map link from the Shawlands and Strathbungo Community Council website and you’ll see the entire wedge between Victoria Road and Polloshaws Road is included as Strathbungo. This includes: Niddrie Road; Craigie Street; parts of Calder Street & Alison Street; Torrisdale Street, Prince Edward Street and a bunch more. Not an insignificant number of households. Indeed, those excluded from the ‘Strathbungo’ (rather than the Strathbungo Conservation Area’) of the the Strathbungo Society probably outnumber those included

  8. isabel
    July 29th, 2011 at 08:41 | #8

    Hi myself and my family have been living in queen square for 2 years now. We love our home, the surronding areas and the community atmosphere. Unfortunaly, we have had problems with neighbours since we have moved in and recently one of our other neighbours was beaten up by them and myself and partner have been spat upon. Police and community officers are involved but without mentioning any names i was wondering if anyone else has suffered as we have by the same family. Is there someone i/we could speak to within te society that may help?? many thanks x

  9. abrown
    February 15th, 2012 at 00:59 | #9

    Is anyone else really annoyed and offended by the massive “Bigger Fatter etc” hoarding at Crossmyloof station – an absolute disgrace, can no one in S Glasgow get this removed?

  10. Chris Jay.
    January 5th, 2016 at 15:25 | #10

    Letter published in the Herald on December 12th., headed ‘Wrong approach to landslips’.

    Landslips have recently disrupted the West Coast railway line. You might have thought that Network Rail would have identified potential landslips, undertaken a risk assessment on each and taken steps to secure them. Instead, it spends its time and money on uprooting vegetation on embankments and erecting high weldmesh security fences along the roadside, regardless of historical or aesthetic considerations. Of course, the dangers of fallen leaves and trespassing must be eliminated if possible, but Network Rail knows only this one brutal solution. It will not countenance discussion with local residents about other ways of securing the line – and there are many. At present, the Greek Thomson terrace in Strathbungo is threatened with this treatment, but the problem is nationwide. Network Rail appears to be a law unto itself, accountable to no one. Should this be allowed to continue.

    Chris Jay. 11 Moray Place.

  11. Marion ben-amir furst
    July 19th, 2016 at 08:26 | #11

    I grew up at 20 nithsdale road in the 40’s and 50’s. I wrote a very short memoir ( a page) of the street as I remember it. Who would be interested in reading it?

  12. Sally
    June 29th, 2017 at 15:29 | #12

    HOMEWORK BOOK FOUND!
    The (red) Homework book of JULIA HUNTER P5/4 has been found in the Back Lane linking the East End of Queen Sq. to Regent Pk Square. *I live locally; If anyone knows who Julia is, please tell her that I found the jotter; It’s clean & dry, undamaged. There’s a plastic protective cover over a front cover which features a drawing on cut-out white paper of a Pokemon Dragon? I know that even if she’s already started a replacement jotter she may still want this back. 45yrs later I wish I still had one or two of my own early schoolbooks. They’re great to look back on when you’re older : )